Hydrokinesis

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Hydrokinesis is the psychical influence of flow in regards to Newtonian liquids such as water [fresh, sea], oil, milk, vinegar, alcohol, and mercury. It involves the experient influence of liquids, which shear stress is linearly proportional to the velocity gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of shear. These liquids, regardless of the forces action on a liquid, continue to flow, such as water, which continues to display liquid properties no matter how much it is stirred or mixed. Newtonian liquids are opposed to Non-Newtonian liquids in which have higher levels of viscosity. Thorough this form of psychokinetic phenomenon, experients can manipulate how liquids flow and behave relative to velocity and rotation [turbulence, vorticity, etc]. This can be achieved through remote, indirect, and direct contact with bodies of liquids. Hydrostatic electricity is generated via the agitation of certain liquids. The rate of generation is influenced by the conductivity of the liquid or the amount of turbulence in the liquid. Liquids with lower conductivities tend to accumulate more static charges, which are typically more difficult to influence in regards to flow or behavior. The most common liquid reported in regards to hydrokinetic phenomena is fresh and seawater. (Kelly, 2013)

Contents

Limitations

Newtonian Fluids

Hydrokinesis is theoretically limited to the influence of Newtonian liquids as opposed to non-Newtonian liquids. This theory is substantiated by years of research yielding no reports in regards the influence of non-Newtonian liquids by experients of characteristic hydrokinetic phenomena. Newtonian liquids are liquids whose shear stress is linearly proportional to the velocity gradient in the direction perpendicular to the plane of shear. These liquids, regardless of the forces action on a liquid, continue to flow, such as water, which continues to display liquid properties no matter how much it is stirred or mixed as opposed to non-Newtonian liquids with higher levels of viscosity. (Kelly, 2013)

In contrast, stirring a non-Newtonian liquid can leave a "hole" behind in which will gradually fill up over time. Alternatively, stirring a non-Newtonian liquid can cause viscosity to decrease, which results in the appearance of a "thinner" liquid. Newtonian types of liquids include water [fresh, sea], oil, milk, vinegar, alcohol, mercury, etc. Non-Newtonian liquids types include blood, honey, latex, pudding, starch in water (oobleck), paint, mud, syrup, etc. (Kelly, 2013)

Water

The most common form of liquid influenced is water. The reason for this could be the direct result of availability and or certain properties that other liquids do not posses. These unique and uncommon properties include differences in hydrogen bonding due to either an inability to donate or accept hydrogen or due to steric effects in bulky residues, which may affect the molecule's preferred shape and reactivity. Although hydrogen bonding is a relatively weak attraction compared to the covalent bonds within the water molecule, it is responsible for a number of water's physical properties. In addition, water shows the anomalous behavior of thermodynamic, kinetic, and structural properties unlike other molecules. (Kelly, 2013)

Chemically speaking, water is amphoteric allowing it to have the properties of both an acid and a base. While there are an array of differences in regards to the properties possessed by water that other forms of liquid do not posses that could be the reason water is a more commonly influenced liquid than any other, like fluid dynamics, hydrokinesis is an active field of research with many unsolved or partly solved problems.(Kelly, 2013)

Temperature vs. Density

Many limitations exist in hydrokinetic performance including the temperature and or density of a liquid attempting to be influenced by and experient. The density of water is dependent on its temperature, but the relation here is not linear nor monotonic. When water is cooled from standard room temperature, water becomes increasingly dense, and at 39 °F water reaches its maximum density. Experients report success in performance favoring either low-density or high-density liquids, but rarely both. Experients also report success in performance favoring either high or low temperature, but rarely both. Experients who are limited to dense water influence should be encouraged to work with water from 77 to 39 °F. Experients who are limited to the influence lesser dense water should be encouraged to work with water from 68 °F to just before the boiling point. (Kelly, 2013)

The density of water is also dependent on the dissolved salt content as well as the temperature of the water. This reflects itself in experient reports denoting difficulty in the ability to influence either fresh water or seawater, but not both. This could be due to ocean water being colder, saltier, or both. Experients should test which type of water is easier to influence by attempting to influence both as to verify if they do or do not have limitations in this area. (Kelly, 2013)

Motion vs. Inertial Forces

Reports regarding the influence of liquids in a static state are equal to that of reports regarding the influence of liquids in motion. However, reports suggest experients may be limited to the influence of one state or the other. Experients in which have a high success rate of influencing the flow of static liquids, liquids at rest, often report the inability to influence the direction of flow successfully once the liquid is put into motion. In addition, experients in which report the ability to influence the direction of flow, tend to report the inability to influence liquids in which are not already in motion. This suggests that some experients of hydrokinetic phenomena may be more subject to inertial forces, whereby limiting some experients to the influence of, or inability to influence, liquids in stable equilibrium. Experients can identify if they have limitations of this nature by implementing flow based and static based exercises into their routine. (Kelly, 2013)

Exercises in regards to static influence tend to involve a medium sized, short, round container with a slightly less than equal volume of liquid, typically water. Exercises pertaining to the influence of flow however range from large sized, short, rectangular containers with a device to create continuous turbulence for horizontal flow exercises, and water streams, typically from a water tap, for vertical flow exercises. Water is the most common liquid used in either regard. (Kelly, 2013)

Measurement and Observation

Water Stream

Many types of experiments and exercises have been developed for experients of hydrokinetic phenomena. In this particular exercise, an experient will need to regulate a water tap to allow a thin stream fall through a distance of at least 6 inches, preferably more. This can be achieved by adjusting the flow from an ordinary water faucet. Experients may have better success using a kitchen sink rather than a bathroom sink as kitchen sinks typically have more depth. (Kelly, 2013)

Experients should adjust the water tap to deliver a stream of water that is as thin as possible, but they should also make sure the flow is not discontinuous. The experient should then bring their hand towards the stream. The experient should hold their hand as close as possible without touching the stream. If enough charge is produced, a reaction will occur. The experient should notice a repulsive reaction in the water stream in which the stream will appear to shift away from their hand in the same or similar regard as an electrical stimulation shifts a stream. Over time, the experient should be encouraged to influence a stream of increased thickness of flow or an increase in the repulsion of a thinner stream. (Kelly, 2013)

Immiscible Liquids

Many types of experiments and exercises have been developed for experients of hydrokinetic phenomena. In this particular exercise, experients must understand that some liquids display immiscibility. A familiar mixture of two immiscible liquids in everyday life is vegetable oil and water as they are incapable of being mixed unlike miscible liquids such as water and alcohol. (Kelly, 2013)

For this exercise, an experient will be required to obtain a basic round container, short in height, holding two-thirds its size of water, and a medium sized drop of vegetable oil. In this exercise the experient will have the option to influence the direction of the oil itself, or create a vortex, or general turbulence, in the water whereby affecting the direction of the drop of oil. Enhancement is measurable through increased speed and rate of rotation or turbulence. Experients can also utilize a measuring cup for this exercise and record the height of the outer layer during rotation or turbulent effect to track progression of influence. (Kelly, 2013)

Symptoms and Side Effects

Perspiration, Thermoregulation, and Water Retention

For these individuals, the most common side effect experienced during the unstable performance of hydrokinetic phenomena is in regards to water and the body. Water based abnormalities can present themselves in a variety of ways including excessive perspiration. Experients may notice excessive sweating during physical activity, or simply during mild daily activities. The abnormal perspiration is commonly coincided with unpleasant odors not only on the body, but also on clothing. This phenomenon is theorized to be a built-in mechanism to prevent difficulties with thermoregulation in experients of unstable hydrokinetic phenomena. (Kelly, 2013)

Instability can result in electrical buildup causing intense heat in several regions of the body. Excessive perspiration is the method the body then uses to cool itself down. Needless to say, this side effect is only prominent in experients in which utilize electric or electromagnetic fields to induce or influence liquid flow. Another side effect pertaining to hydrokinetic instability is water retention.Water retention is commonly reported as excessive weight gain, but is also indicative of a lack of thirst, or lacking of signs of dehydration after not consuming adequate amounts of water over an extended period. Because these effects are due to instability, these effects tend to subside after stability is obtained. (Kelly, 2013)

See also

References

  1. Kelly, Theresa M.(2013) Manual of Hydrokinesis: Applications, Experimentation, and Measurement
    Charleston, South Carolina USA.

Further Reading

  1. Kelly, Theresa M.(2013) Quantum Psychics - Scientifically Understand, Enhance and Control Your Psychic Ability,
    Charleston, South Carolina USA (ISBN: 9780557034024).
  2. Kelly, Theresa M. (2013) Manual of Hydrokinesis: Applications, Experimentation, and Measurement
    Charleston, South Carolina USA.

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