Cryokinesis

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Cryokinesis is the psychical influence involving the deceleration of charged particles to low speeds, typically electrons because of their light weight, via an experients own electrical fields or through the remote influence of similar fields. Experients act as low energy particle decelerators whereby decreasing the temperature of systems, or objects, that are not in thermodynamic equilibrium. Decreased temperatures can lead to object phase changes via the physical processes of cooling or condensation, or result in solidification via freezing. Cryokinesis is also the psychical influence of energy flow in regards to heat absorption. In heat absorption, because of the lower temperature of the experient, heat spontaneously flows from the system, or remote source, in the direction of the experient as long as the experient is cooler than the system as per the second law of thermodynamics. When a thermal connection is made, such as radiation or conduction, the experient and system will exchange internal energy until their temperatures are equalized; that is, until they reach thermodynamic equilibrium. [1]

Contents

Misconceptions and Myths

Psychosomatic Symptoms

Cryokinesis is often misconstrued in regards to psychosomatic symptoms that present themselves as hallucinatory effects pertaining to thermoception. Psychosomatic symptoms typically misconstrued as cryokinetic phenomena include meditations involving the hands being placed, “cupped,” near each other, but are not in contact with each other, with the individual using imagery to “cool” the region between both hands. This imagery can create a false or distorted sense of perception that appears to be a real perception. In this case, the individual believes the air between their hands is being cooled, when in actuality the effect is merely a distortion.. Experients of cryokinetic phenomena can verify the validity of their perceptions by placing an unobtrusive digital thermometer between their hands that measures air temperature in real-time. [1]

Limitations

Heat Conduction vs. Radiation

Reported limitations pertaining to psychokinetic-based influence in regards to heat flow include heat conduction verses heat radiation. In cryokinetic heat transfer, conduction [heat conduction] is the transfer of thermal energy between the experient and a system or object. In the case of cold compression therapy, this transfer would be between the experient and the client. This transfer is due to a temperature gradient, which directs the flow of heat from regions of higher temperatures to regions of lower temperatures. While experients are decelerating particles via their natural electrical fields, the heat from the client is spontaneously directed from the client to the experient. Unlike radiation, this flow is possible via the direct touch between the experient and the client. Radiation on the other hand, does not require direct touch, but rather localization to a substance or system. [1]

Condensation vs. Frost

Commonly reported limitations pertain to decreasing temperatures of air at dew point or below dew point. The dew point is the temperature in which a given parcel of air must be cooled, at a constant barometric pressure, for water vapor to condense into water droplets. When this phase change occurs, gas to liquid, it is called condensation. When this maximal threshold and level of molecular density of water vapor occurs and temperatures continue to drop below the dew point, frost crystals begin to develop. Limitations between these two types pertain to decreasing temperatures slowly resulting in condensation and then low-insulator frost or decreasing temperatures quickly resulting in radiation frost [deposition]. These types of frost occur when temperatures are reduced below the freezing point of water at 32 °F or 0 °C. [1]

States of Matter

Condensation is the change in the [aggregation] phase of matter from the gaseous phase into liquid droplets at dew point. The dew point [about 59 °F (15 °C)] is the temperature in which a given parcel of air must be cooled, at a constant barometric pressure, for water vapor to condense into these droplets. For this type of exercise, the experient should be encouraged to use liquid water. The experient will need to obtain a drinking glass and fill the drinking glass about half with tap or freshwater. To start, experients should attempt the exercise with only half of the glass filled, and work their way up in volume based on successful influence. Later, the experients can increase to a nearly full glass of water to increase the difficulty of the exercise. The less water involved in the exercise, the less water required to be cooled to the dew point. This exercise can result in ice if temperatures slowly drop below the freezing point [32 °F (0 °C)]. If rapidly cooled, frost may occur. Which type of frost is dependant of the temperatures reached [i.e. slight frost: 32 to 25.7 °F [0 to -3.5 °C ]. [1]

Measurement & Observation

Condensation and Freezing Liquids

Condensation is the change in the [aggregation] phase of matter from the gaseous phase into liquid droplets at dew point. The dew point [about 59 °F (15 °C)] is the temperature in which a given parcel of air must be cooled, at a constant barometric pressure, for water vapor to condense into these droplets. For this type of exercise, the experient should be encouraged to use liquid water. The experient will need to obtain a drinking glass and fill the drinking glass about half with tap or freshwater. To start, experients should attempt the exercise with only half of the glass filled, and work their way up in volume based on successful influence. Later, the experients can increase to a nearly full glass of water to increase the difficulty of the exercise. The less water involved in the exercise, the less water required to be cooled to the dew point. This exercise can result in ice if temperatures slowly drop below the freezing point [32 °F (0 °C)]. If rapidly cooled, frost may occur. Which type of frost is dependant of the temperatures reached [i.e. slight frost: 32 to 25.7 °F [0 to -3.5 °C ]. [1]

See also

References

  1. Kelly, Dr. Theresa M.(2011) Manual of Cryokinesis: Applications, Experimentation, and Measurement
    Charleston, South Carolina USA.

Further Reading

  1. Kelly, Dr. Theresa M.(2011) Manual of Cryokinesis: Applications, Experimentation, and Measurement
    Charleston, South Carolina USA.

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